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Split photo, one side showing a traditional cheeseburger, the other side showing a chicken sandwich on a bun
Swapping just one item can make diets substantially more planet-friendly
  If Americans swappped one serving of beef per day for chicken, their diets' greenhouse gas emissions would fall by an average of 48 percent and water-use impact by 30 percent, according to the study. Photo by iStock. If your New Year’s resolution is to eat better for the planet, a new Tulane...
10/25/2021 - 10:00 - Tulane SPHTM Communications Staff

Dr. Melissa Fuster has written a book entitled “Caribeños at the Table: How Migration, Health, and Race Intersect in New York City,” from the University of North Carolina Press. The book addresses issues pertinent to public health and nutrition, focusing on Hispanic Caribbean communities in New...

10/22/2021 - 09:45 - Lance Sumler

Having “the talk” is a task shouldered by millions of Black families each year as parents try to protect their children from racist experiences, including the possibility of being unfairly profiled by the police. What would happen if critical and honest conversations about race, racism and...

10/19/2021 - 08:45 - Keith Brannon

Tiong Aw, PhD, assistant professor of Environmental Health Sciences at Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, analyzes water samples for viruses using a portable DNA sequencer. Around 34 billion gallons of water go down the drain every day. Could some of it be recycled...

10/18/2021 - 10:00 - Dee Boling

Dr. Lina Moses, associate professor of tropical medicine, was a member of a scientific advisory group to the Global Research Collaboration for Infectious Disease Preparedness (GloPID-R) that has released recommendations for funding COVID-19 research over the next 18-24 months. The number one goal...

10/12/2021 - 10:00 - Dee Boling

For 28 years, national correspondent Pam Fessler reported on poverty, philanthropy, and issues of national concern. For her first book, Fessler turned to a disease that doesn’t garner a lot of attention in the headlines, but for more than a century played a major role in the small town of...

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