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Maeve Wallace, Assistant Professor, Global Community Health and Behavioral Sciences
Tulane researcher studies maternal mortality and the reasons behind it
Maeve Wallace is a reproductive and perinatal epidemiologist at Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. The U.S. has the highest maternal mortality rate in the developed world, and Louisiana consistently ranks among the top states for rates of death among pregnant and...
01/29/2018 - 10:45 - Carolyn Scofield

Cover your coughs in New England and don’t double dip in Philadelphia. A 2016 Tulane University study published in the American Journal of Health Economics found cities with teams in the Super Bowl see a rise in flu deaths. Lead author Charles Stoecker of the Tulane University School of Public...

01/24/2018 - 16:15 - Dee Boling

On September 13, 2017, it was announced that Philip Morris International plans to contribute close to $1 billion to fund an organization to be known as the Foundation for a Smoke-Free World. The Foundation has the stated mission of reducing illness and death from smoking and lists as its priorities...

01/24/2018 - 10:30 - Faith Dawson

Katherine Mills, assistant professor of epidemiology in the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, led a team that analyzed 100 blood pressure studies to find which interventions worked best to control hypertension. (Photo by Paula Burch-Celentano) A new study out of...

01/12/2018 - 15:30 - Keith Brannon

People whose genes put them at greater risks for obesity may reap bigger benefits from sticking to a healthy diet than those at lower genetic risk, according to a new study in the journal The BMJ led by a team of Tulane researchers. The study suggests that improving diet quality over time can...

01/12/2018 - 11:15 - Angus Lind

This story was originally published in the December 2017 issue of Tulane magazine. Call them the ambassadors for New Orleans—the city’s walking tour guides, who face the daunting task of condensing 300 years of complicated and confusing history into two hours. Imagine having to explain to people...

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