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Bicyclists ride along the Lafitte Greenway.

Research Highlights

Study finds yield lights have drivers hitting gas instead of brakes at Lafitte Greenway

Tulane students led by epidemiologist Jeanette Gustat, an associate professor at Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, observed cyclists, pedestrians and cars on the Greenway. (Picture by Paula Burch-Celentano) Lights at intersections where the Lafitte Greenway meets New Orleans’ busy streets are meant to make drivers stop for cyclists and pedestrians. That’s the intention, at least. New research from Tulane University, however, finds drivers are more likely to hit the gas instead of the brakes when they see those lights flashing. Students, trained as research assistants, and led by epidemiologist Jeanette Gustat, an associate professor at Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, observed nine different intersections along the Greenway. They spent more than two hours at each, and recorded 861 cyclists, 318 pedestrians and 923 cars on the Greenway or crossing it during the course of two days. Keep reading>>

New Pediatric Blood Pressure Guidelines Identify More Kids at Higher Risk of Premature Heart Disease

Based on a heart research study completed within the department of epidemiology, at the Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine in New Orleans, there are now new guidelines that classify more children as having elevated blood pressure. These new guidelines are better at predicting which kids are likely to develop heart disease when they reach adulthood, according to the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension. The guidelines were issued by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) in 2017 and endorsed by the American Heart Association. Keep reading >>

Study Finds Improved WIC Food Packages Reduced Obesity Risk for Children

Sweeping changes designed to make a major federal food assistance program more nutritious for low-income families were effective in reducing obesity risk for 4-year-olds who had been on the program since birth, according to a new study by researchers from Tulane University, the University of California, Los Angeles, and PHFE WIC. “Our study shows that improving nutrition quality made a measurable impact in lowering obesity risk for children receiving the new food package compared to those receiving the old,” said lead author Pia Chaparro, assistant professor of nutrition at Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine.  Keep reading >>