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Dr. Stuart Spencer joined The Lancet in 1999 and throughout his time there has led the FastTrack team that aims to select, review and publish prestigious manuscripts within 4 weeks of receipt.  Although dealing with all areas of research, he deals with the cardiology submissions. 

Join us for an installment of On the Front Lines: Community Health Scientists At Work. On the Front Lines is a webinar series that explores what Community Health Scientists are doing in a variety of practice settings. The guest speaker is Claire Gregory. All students are welcome! The event will be via Zoom on Thursday, October 14 at 7:00 pm CST and the Zoom ID: 9145846 7131 and Passcode: 906723.

On the Front Lines Flyer

Join us for an installment of On the Front Lines: Health Administrators in Action. On the Front Lines is a webinar series that explores what the Health Administrators are doing in a variety of practice settings. The guest speaker is COL Damon T. Arnold. All students are welcome! The event will be via Zoom on Tuesday, October 19, at 7:00 pm CST and the Zoom ID: 982 5319 9620 and Passcode: 130785

Flyer for On the Front Lines

Both Borrelia burgdorferi and Bartonella species arevector-transmitted pathogens which cause diseases that are difficult to diagnose and cure. While Lyme disease is well recognized as a public health problem, Bartonellosis is underappreciated. Our laboratory utilizes both culture and animal model systems to test candidate therapeutics targeting these pathogens. Both traditional antibiotics and novel small molecules are currently being assessed for their ability to eradicatethe pathogens.

Join Zoom Meeting

https://tulane.zoom.us/j/91701329032?pwd=Nmo4TWtDQXlYdXRTS3dXbHZZbWVWQT09

 

Meeting ID: 917 0132 9032

Passcode: 885155

 

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        +1 646 558 8656 US (New York)

        +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)

        +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)

The dynamic variation in Gamma Delta (γδ) T cells impacts the initiation, progression and prognosis of infectious diseases, including those caused by viral infections in mucosal tissues. Deeper understanding of their diverse immune functions through in vivo studies in nonhuman primate models of infectious diseases could enable the design of novel γδ T cell-based therapies. Toward this, we are studying the effector functions of γδ T cells in the context of chronic HIV infection and early SARS-CoV-2 infection.

 

Part of the Department of Health Policy & Management seminar series

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